DIY Soundproofing?

fagfag Regular
edited October 2011 in Life
Wanting to build a quiet noise-isolated room for sleeping and jamming(guitar). What materials are easily available that will block sound? Would this stuff work?

http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber=15328-288-15328&langId=-1&storeId=10151&productId=3014172&catalogId=10051&cmRelshp=req&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1

I was thinking that, but in a 2" thickness. I live near the factory, and could get seconds for very cheap. Would it do well if combined with something like masonite for sound reflection? That is more sound dampening. Would it be useful to put in that pink cotton candy type insulation stuff? Like, would the pink insulation do the same job, but less efficiently, or a different job altogether? Maybe a Layer of 1" R-Max, a layer of pink fibreglass, another layer of R-Max, and then the hard board? I really don't know much about acoustics.

Comments

  • edited October 2011
    Egg boxes and that foam shit with the dimples in work well. It's very DIY, and basically works by reflecting the sound due to the curved shape of the materials. My Dad's friend built a band practice room which is soundproofed with similar materials, and is also kinda like a building inside a building. Keeps sound in very nicely.
  • RogueEagle91RogueEagle91 Regular
    edited October 2011
    I would think if you cut/drilled/whatever out some sort of curve into the first insulation, it would help to some degree. Two inch thick will do some dampening, but definitely with some added soundwave reflection, you'd be better.

    Depending on the size of space you have, the ones TDR posted look like damn good options. As far as soundproofing goes, it's pretty cheap, too.

    Fluff insulation does increase noise reduction, but there are definitely better options. Plus, fuck getting fiberglass strands embedded in your skin.
  • fagfag Regular
    edited October 2011
    Looks like about $600 of that stuff TDR posted could double-layer the walls and ceiling. :o Still well within the budget too.
  • chippychippy <b style="color:pink;">Global Moderator</b>
    edited October 2011
    Egg boxes do not sound insulate. Neither does rock wool type insulation. both of these absorb some of the sound waves but not enough to make any difference. The reason egg box type surfaces are used in recording studio's is because they do not provide a flat surface for the reflection of sound. This means the echo or reverberation is reduced to a low level, producing a dead room for the recording. This is useful to recording technicians as they can add their own echo and reverb to mimic any situation. They are in effect just recording the pure sound and not any ambience the room adds to it.
    To sound proof effectively you need mass, and lots of it. A single layer of plasterboard will provide much more sound proofing than 4" of rockwool insulation. Professionally I use a high density rubber sheet to soundproof doors, and high density boards to insulate walls. This is the company I use to provide my materials. There is some interesting information on their FAQ page.

    http://www.noisestopsystems.co.uk/faqs-15/?zenid=e491538f00ff6005ccb0290b461d229c
  • edited October 2011
    ^ Well fuck me, I stand corrected :facepalm: Thanks for the info.
  • fagfag Regular
    edited October 2011
    chippy wrote: »
    Egg boxes do not sound insulate. Neither does rock wool type insulation. both of these absorb some of the sound waves but not enough to make any difference. The reason egg box type surfaces are used in recording studio's is because they do not provide a flat surface for the reflection of sound. This means the echo or reverberation is reduced to a low level, producing a dead room for the recording. This is useful to recording technicians as they can add their own echo and reverb to mimic any situation. They are in effect just recording the pure sound and not any ambience the room adds to it.
    To sound proof effectively you need mass, and lots of it. A single layer of plasterboard will provide much more sound proofing than 4" of rockwool insulation. Professionally I use a high density rubber sheet to soundproof doors, and high density boards to insulate walls. This is the company I use to provide my materials. There is some interesting information on their FAQ page.

    http://www.noisestopsystems.co.uk/faqs-15/?zenid=e491538f00ff6005ccb0290b461d229c


    So what about these soda bottle crates? They are a dense plastic with prism shaped pillars. I can procure them for free in bulk. Best diagram I could find:

    D505014&w=120

    What if I got a bunch of these, placed them in the corners, and possibly around walls, and then hung up some of that Audimute sheet that TDR posted? Theoretically, sound should pass through the absorbant sheet, hit the crate prism and diffuse a bit, reflect off the wall, and go back the way they came, hitting all the same barriers again..Would it work that way?

    Also, as a diy option, what about floor rubber? The kind of padding they put down under carpet?
  • chippychippy <b style="color:pink;">Global Moderator</b>
    edited October 2011
    fag wrote: »
    So what about these soda bottle crates? They are a dense plastic with prism shaped pillars. I can procure them for free in bulk. Best diagram I could find:

    D505014&w=120

    What if I got a bunch of these, placed them in the corners, and possibly around walls, and then hung up some of that Audimute sheet that TDR posted? Theoretically, sound should pass through the absorbant sheet, hit the crate prism and diffuse a bit, reflect off the wall, and go back the way they came, hitting all the same barriers again..Would it work that way?

    Also, as a diy option, what about floor rubber? The kind of padding they put down under carpet?

    It's all to do with density. Fill the bottles with water and plaster the walls with them and yeah that would work. And yes, carpet underlay would be great, if it's a heavy high density one, as would carpet be too.
  • fagfag Regular
    edited October 2011
    The Audimute sheets have arrived. They cut down the high end pretty well, and they are pretty cool looking. Also, a friend of mine gave me a few 6'x20' rolls of thick carpet underlay. The underlay seems to have a lot more going for it as far as cost effectiveness and sound reduction go. The Audimute just looks cool, and gets rid of harsh reverb. I will likely put 3 or so layers of underlay on all the walls and ceiling, some proper foam sound absorption squares boards over that, then cover it up with the Audimute.

    I have a sheet in my bedroom, over the windows. It's pitch fucking black. Works very well for this. /thumbsup.
  • Darth BeaverDarth Beaver Meine Ehre heißt Treue
    edited October 2011
    I am glad my suggestion worked out for you well bro. Keep us posted with any updates to your soundproofing.
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