Plasma Arc Project — Totseans

Plasma Arc Project

CrazzyassCrazzyass Regular
edited August 2010 in Life
Alright, ladies and gents, I am working on my first real DIY project: a plasma arc. I have two computers worth of electronics and determination. Halp?


But seriously. I have a pretty good guide, but I am indeed a noob. Any suggestions/steps/advice on where to start?

Comments

  • KatzenklavierKatzenklavier Regular
    edited August 2010
    Wrong forum brah!

    But what do you want to do, just make arcs right now?
  • CrazzyassCrazzyass Regular
    edited August 2010
    Wrong forum brah!

    But what do you want to do, just make arcs right now?

    Haha I'm going to post there too, but I want to generate some traffic here as well. :)
  • KatzenklavierKatzenklavier Regular
    edited August 2010
    Still didn't answer question #2. :mad:

    Also, you probably should've put this in the circuits forum.
  • CrazzyassCrazzyass Regular
    edited August 2010
    Still didn't answer question #2. :mad:

    Also, you probably should've put this in the circuits forum.

    Oops :o:o:o

    I want to make it into a plasma arc speaker, actually.



    And yeah, I struggled with it, but finally decided that it ended up here because it's more about the act of the project and DIY'ing it than it is about the arc itself...if that makes sense, haha.
  • KatzenklavierKatzenklavier Regular
    edited August 2010
    You can't make a speaker with only the parts from a computer. And if you somehow managed to, it'd likely die quickly.

    I'd recommend you just start with making an arc right now. It's pretty fun if you've never done it before. The simplest circuit for driving the flyback it this. Instead of the 2n3055 you can use the msofet that came with the flyback in the monitor.
    http://www.powerlabs.org/flybackdriver.htm
    schematic1.gif

    Use two computer psu's in series to power it.
  • CrazzyassCrazzyass Regular
    edited August 2010
    You can't make a speaker with only the parts from a computer. And if you somehow managed to, it'd likely die quickly.

    I'd recommend you just start with making an arc right now. It's pretty fun if you've never done it before. The simplest circuit for driving the flyback it this. Instead of the 2n3055 you can use the msofet that came with the flyback in the monitor.
    http://www.powerlabs.org/flybackdriver.htm
    schematic1.gif

    Use two computer psu's in series to power it.

    I can get more parts if necessary. But I agree. I'll set up a regular one first, and then improve it. Muahahaha.
  • KatzenklavierKatzenklavier Regular
    edited August 2010
    When taking apart the monitors, you can use a blowtorch for mass de-soldering.
  • CrazzyassCrazzyass Regular
    edited August 2010
    When taking apart the monitors, you can use a blowtorch for mass de-soldering.

    Can you elaborate on that? Just drench it in blowtorch? :hai:
  • KatzenklavierKatzenklavier Regular
    edited August 2010
    Mhm. Blowtorch the bottom of what you want to de-solder. The component will pull right out. Do it outside though, because the circuit board will burn and it stinks! Use pliers to pull things out (parts get hot!).

    In 30 minutes you can get a shitload of parts.
  • CrazzyassCrazzyass Regular
    edited August 2010
    Mhm. Blowtorch the bottom of what you want to de-solder. The component will pull right out. Do it outside though, because the circuit board will burn and it stinks!

    In 30 minutes you can get a shitload of parts.

    Sounds awesome. I also have two CPUs, btw, so all the parts available in those are at my disposal. :)

    I'm going to crack them open tomorrow and take a look-see. The monitors I should get to this weekend.
  • KatzenklavierKatzenklavier Regular
    edited August 2010
    Can't do anything with the cpu. The power supplies are useful though.
  • CrazzyassCrazzyass Regular
    edited August 2010
    Can't do anything with the cpu. The power supplies are useful though.

    Cool. What about heat sinks/capacitors/resistors/etc? The computers are at least a decade old, btw.
  • KatzenklavierKatzenklavier Regular
    edited August 2010
    Nah, the digital circuitry is useless... The heatsinks you could use to cool the mosfets though.

    A decade old? Hmm look at the PSU's. Often old ones will have nearly all the power on the 5v line, and give you only a couple amps on the 12v... not much you can do with that. The PSU's have nice parts though. Mosfets, capacitors, and inductors a plenty.

    Car batteries are very nice for powering flyback circuits. Amps a plenty.
  • CrazzyassCrazzyass Regular
    edited August 2010
    Nah, the digital circuitry is useless... The heatsinks you could use to cool the mosfets though.

    A decade old? Hmm look at the PSU's. Often old ones will have nearly all the power on the 5v line, and give you only a couple amps on the 12v... not much you can do with that. The PSU's have nice parts though. Mosfets, capacitors, and inductors a plenty.

    Car batteries are very nice for powering flyback circuits. Amps a plenty.

    Yep. Dell's from pre-'99, and one might be from '95 or so.

    I was planning on getting all the heat sinks/mosfets/capacitors out and whatnot...I might pick up an old car battery too. Shouldn't be too hard to find.
  • KatzenklavierKatzenklavier Regular
    edited August 2010
    Get 2. They don't even have to be any "good." It's not like your drawing 200A starting an engine.

    24v will give you much better results than 12.
  • CrazzyassCrazzyass Regular
    edited August 2010
    Get 2. They don't even have to be any "good." It's not like your drawing 200A starting an engine.

    24v will give you much better results than 12.

    Duly noted. I should get images%3Fq%3Dpower%2Bsource%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26biw%3D1280%26bih%3D683%26tbs%3Disch:1&um=1&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=151&vpy=126&dur=141&hovh=208&hovw=243&tx=112&ty=105&ei=1uh1TOSrFcL78Aaqyf39BQ&oei=1uh1TOSrFcL78Aaqyf39BQ&esq=1&page=1&ndsp=15&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0 to run the batteries through.
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