Official Thread O' Lockpicking and Jacking Shit — Totseans

Official Thread O' Lockpicking and Jacking Shit

edited July 2011 in Man Cave
Always keep shit hypothetical in nature, brahs.

Hao Tu doo a Pin Lock
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZJe23UD8wU

EZ Master Lock (Thanks DFG)

http://hackaday.com/2009/10/06/how-to-crack-a-master-lock/

Quote:
Long, long ago we covered a method to crack a Master lock in about 30 minutes or less. Here’s a revival of the same method but now the instructions to retrieve the combination are in info-graphic format created by [Mark Edward Campos].

If you didn’t get to try this the first time around, here’s how it works: A combination of a physical vulnerability, math, and brute force is used. First, the final number of the code can be obtained by pulling up on the latch while the dial is rotated. Because of the way the lock is built the correct number can be extrapolated using this trick. Secondly, a table of all possible first and second number combinations has been calculated for you. Third, it’s your job to brute force the correct table of possibilities which includes only about one hundred combinations.

We’re not really into felony theft and hopefully you’re not either. But, we have a nasty habit of needing to use a combination lock that’s been in a drawer for a few years and having no idea of what the correct code might be.

masterlock01.jpg?w=470&h=307

Nao Shim It with a Beer Can:




Tubular Locks





Comments

  • theinvadertheinvader Acolyte
    edited July 2010
    I haven't had the masterlock combo thing work for me yet. I always end up with either 4 or 5 third numbers and they never make sense. Fuck.
  • edited July 2010
    theinvader wrote: »
    I haven't had the masterlock combo thing work for me yet. I always end up with either 4 or 5 third numbers and they never make sense. Fuck.

    Haha, I had that problem too. I just gave up in the end!
  • jamie madroxjamie madrox Sith Lord
    edited July 2010
    I've been looking into making and trying out a shim.
  • DfgDfg Admin
    edited July 2010
    Thanks for the information.

    Thread Stickied.
  • muffinsmuffins Regular
    edited July 2010
    I've never bothered to pick a lock but this weekend imma give this a try the sunday paper boxes would be ripe for some cash
  • edited July 2010
    muffins wrote: »
    I've never bothered to pick a lock but this weekend imma give this a try the sunday paper boxes would be ripe for some cash

    Awesome, let us know how it goes. What techniques are you thinking of using?
  • SilosighbinSilosighbin Regular
    edited July 2010
    I carry several hand-made shims in my wallet at all times lol. Haven't found a chance to use 'em yet though. I also recently bought a 10 piece tubular lock picking set, but at the moment haven't managed to open any locks. It's quite tricky.
  • StaplesStaples Regular
    edited July 2010
    -BEST locks are a bitch
    -focus
    -relax
    -practice feeling the pins slip into place
    -feel cool when you do it right
  • edited July 2010
    Good shit.
  • ch1rpch1rp Acolyte
    edited August 2010
    .....................
  • OnTheFringeOnTheFringe Acolyte
    edited August 2010
    muffins wrote: »
    I've never bothered to pick a lock but this weekend imma give this a try the sunday paper boxes would be ripe for some cash

    thats pretty tough for a beginner

    you think they keep money and other good stuff with locks that are easily picked?

    when your starting out work with interior building doors (doors with locks inside a building) , more than likely these have no security pins

    once you have a feel for picking locks and understand how tedious it can be at times, purchase a lock with security pints, or just steal one and practice on it at home. locks with security pins are typically placed on exterior doors (entrances inside a building) , change boxes, etc...stuff that has value .

    these kinds of locks can be really tricky at times if you know anything about the diversity of security pins, i mean at that point you might as well use destructive means to get the job done quicker.

    however its a great skill to learn by all means, useful in ops
  • thewandererthewanderer Regular
    edited March 2011
    Security Pins
    Security pins are used to make locks more resistant to picking. When a key is inserted into a lock and the pins are raised as one, security pins will behave as a normal driver. When there is tension on the plug and pins are not raised in unison, a security pin becomes trapped in the plug at the shear line of the lock.

    The plug moves slightly but the lock won't open. This is called a false set.

    When a false set is detected, different methods must be used to defeat the security pin.
    There are 3 major types of security pins. Spool, mushroom and serrated pins, all of which behave differently but accomplish the same thing. Generally, you need to ease tension slightly and then jiggle the pin.

    Youtube can probably explain this better than I can.


    Car doors
  • ShadyLadyShadyLady Locked
    edited May 2011
    Here are some sites I've found informative for beginner learning:

    Lockpickguide.com http://www.lockpickguide.com/index.html

    Lockpicklibrary.com http://www.lockpicklibrary.com/how-tos

    MIT Guide to lockpicking PDF http://www.lockpickguide.com/support-files/mitguidetolockpick.pdf

    LSI Guide to lockpicking PDF http://www.lockpickguide.com/support-files/lsiguide.pdf

    Secrets of lockpicking PDF http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/~orlovm/papers/scrtlock.pdf

    Guide on how to remove pins from the lock: http://gregmiller.net/locks/disassemble.html

    Lockpicking101 (don't allude to illegal activity) http://www.lockpicking101.com/

    I bought my picks from this site: http://www.lockpickshop.com/ use the coupon code lp101 to get 10% off.
  • edited May 2011
    Wow, thanks Shady. That will give me something to read over the next few weeks :thumbsup: Also, for anyone interested in that reading material, I can already tell you that the MIT guide is definitely worth the read. It's got some nice diagrams inside and it really explains how the locks work.
  • ShadyLadyShadyLady Locked
    edited May 2011
    Here's more links:

    Re-pinning a cylinder lock - A guide by illusion http://www.lockpicking101.com/viewtopic.php?t=10505

    Kwikset deadbolt disassembly http://www.lockpicking101.com/viewtopic.php?p=28232

    Disassembling a Kwikset lock http://www.lockpicking101.com/viewtopic.php?t=3214

    Grades of locks and levels of security http://www.lockpicking101.com/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=554

    Lockpick identification http://www.lockpicking101.com/viewtopic.php?t=7568

    I've found Lockpicking101 EXTREMELY helpful, however if you join you CANNOT allude to illegal activity.

    Don't make the newbie mistakes I made. When you order your picks make sure to order a cylinder shim & plug follower(s). I didn't order either with my picks so I went to a locksmith shop in town & they wouldn't sell me either b/c it is illegal in my state to buy lockpicking supplies if you are not certified/a professional. A 1/2 inch piece of copper coupling can be used a plug follower as can many random items. For those that do not know what copper coupling is- it's a piece of metal you can find it in home improvement stores in the aisle with all the copper pipes.
  • thewandererthewanderer Regular
    edited May 2011
    Great post. :D
    I've been the only one posting in this thread for the past half year. We need more lock enthusiasts here. :mad: I hope you decide to stick around, shady.
    *Reading time.*
  • edited May 2011
    Don't get too hung up on lockpicking, and don't despair if you can't get a lock open. There's always a way in, and it's easy to forget the other options you may have if lockpicking should fail. My buddy has lost out on some easy cheese because of this mindset.
    Great post. :D
    I've been the only one posting in this thread for the past half year. We need more lock enthusiasts here. :mad: I hope you decide to stick around, shady.
    *Reading time.*1

    I pick, although only for profit. So, hey man. :cool:
  • edited May 2011
    Should lockpicking fail, what other methods have you got at your disposal?
  • edited May 2011
    trx100 wrote: »
    Should lockpicking fail, what other methods have you got at your disposal?
    Destructive entry. :mad::mad: Not just with respect to the lock (many locks can be drilled should your picking skills fall short), but also the doors, windows and walls. Once my buddy, having been met with a bilock, disassembled a whole damn window, frame and all. It was wooden and came apart easy, but damn it was slow - noise was an issue and had to be kept to a minimum. Another bilock on another job was defeated because it was on a door with a lot of exposed bolt... he pushed it back with an allen key-cum-tension wrench. Key pads can be shoulder-surfed from a distance. I've never been so inclined, but entry via a tiled roof doesn't seem too imposing a task. Maybe even corrugated metal, if you could pull the bolts or whatever out. Internal plaster walls are piss-easy, although older ones seem harder... bring a stud detector regardless. If you're the necessary combination of desperate and ambitious, pick-pocketing/burglary/robbery/aggravated burglary can get ya the key or an imprint in some clay/putty.
  • ShadyLadyShadyLady Locked
    edited May 2011
    trx100 wrote: »
    Should lockpicking fail, what other methods have you got at your disposal?

    Smash a window? You can use masking tape so it doesn't break into a gazillion pieces/doesn't make as much noise. For residential homes, the back sliding glass door is a weak point.
  • thewandererthewanderer Regular
    edited May 2011
    Using locking for bad ideas application is sacrificing speed for stealth. In reality, locks only keep honest people out. Destructive entry is usually faster and easier. Who wants to go through the trouble of picking a lock when you can just kick the door down?
    ShadyLady wrote:
    Smash a window? You can use masking tape so it doesn't break into a gazillion pieces/doesn't make as much noise. For residential homes, the back sliding glass door is a weak point.
    When dealing with glass, a glass cutter could add some stealth. Also on topic of residential homes, external doors lack security pins in the lock 9 times out of 10. This makes for easy picking.
  • edited May 2011
    We need a guide on the many methods which can be used for breaking windows. There should be loud, quick methods and quieter, slower ones listed :D Anyone know much about this subject? I'd love to see a guide, really.
  • OnesanOnesan Acolyte
    edited May 2011
    Easy way into windows without too much noise is simply newspaper and microwaved honey, simply smear your honey onto the paper and apply over the surface of the glass, do that a few times to build up a few 'plys' of paper and then hit with a hammer in the middle so the sheet of glass cracks, then hit around the edges of the glass now the middles been weakened, eventually the glass will fall out in one shattered sheet, keep in mind that this isnt exactly the most stealthy of ways to gain entry but its quite effective and not nearly as noisy or suspicious as just smashing it, if you heard this it would sound closer to someone kicking a timber wall or hammering something and less like a window being smashed out.

    Edit, oops forgot explaination., microwaved honey is hot, glass is cold, paper is well paper, and come to think of it a warning, watch out for wasps, and police, on top of all the normal reasons to watch out for police im not sure how id explain those seemingly out of place items even in a burglars kit, hypothetical mr pig investigating one of my hypothetical burglar kits " hmm gloves lockpicks check, cordless drill ok, hatchet thing with crowbar hook on the back? what the hell?, pocket blowtorch fine ok not the wierdest thing ive seen, led light yay something more normal, vaseline wtf VASELINE THIS IS GETTING CREEPY, ? honey? wait its still hot... umm err inspector could you come over here a sec and look at this!"
  • ShadyLadyShadyLady Locked
    edited May 2011
    Great post. :D
    I've been the only one posting in this thread for the past half year. We need more lock enthusiasts here. :mad: I hope you decide to stick around, shady.
    *Reading time.*
    I pick, although only for profit. So, hey man. :cool:

    Locksport is great hobby. You challenge your self to figure stuff out. Good on the brain. It's also a cheap hobby. I posted all thse links about repinning locks b/c you don't necessarily need to go out & buy a ton of different locks. You can take pins out & once you master picking with what's in there, you can add more pins. If you have a cylinder shim & plug followers (or items that can suffice as plug followers) you can get locks for free or very cheap at random places such as thrift stores & repin them.
  • thewandererthewanderer Regular
    edited May 2011
    ShadyLady wrote: »
    Locksport is great hobby. You challenge your self to figure stuff out. Good on the brain. It's also a cheap hobby.
    If you're good at it, practice locks won't cost very much. :D
    I posted all thse links about repinning locks b/c you don't necessarily need to go out & buy a ton of different locks. You can take pins out & once you master picking with what's in there, you can add more pins. If you have a cylinder shim & plug followers (or items that can suffice as plug followers) you can get locks for free or very cheap at random places such as thrift stores & repin them.
    I don't get to mess around with the insides of locks very often. The majority of the ones that I come across are laminated locks.
  • thewandererthewanderer Regular
    edited June 2011
    79 text-files on locks and lockpicking here.
  • thewandererthewanderer Regular
    edited July 2011
    From now until 31 July, anyone buying lockpicks from http://southord.com/ can receive a 25% discount by entering "SO1776" into the coupon code box. :D
Sign In or Register to comment.